Assignment C (DT): Rust, Old Walls & Texture

When you start looking for rust and old things, they seem to come out of the woodwork. Quite literally. I was surprised by how many run down old things I found in fancy postcodes across the Mornington Peninsula!

Rust (so far) – I hope i’m on the right track. I do like the not so overtly “rusty images” (like the door hinge), but not sure if they meet the brief

_MG_5349  _MG_1677_MG_1692  _MG_5363_MG_5356-2  _MG_5364_MG_5370  IMG_1558

Old Walls (so far) -I’ve had a bit of a hard time finding interesting old walls. There are plenty of boring old walls that is for sure! I thought rust would be the hard one, but for me its been walls. What i’ve got so far seems a bit lifeless to me.

_MG_1674  IMG_1605_MG_5358  IMG_1609

  IMG_1596  IMG_1569

IMG_1604

This old place in Red Hill was a great resource (until the owner turned up and kicked me out)!

Textures (so far) – The image top right was an old abandoned leather couch, but my husband pointed out it looks like a close up of a finger. A very dirty one. I do see it!

_MG_1709  IMG_1602

 IMG_1586  _MG_5344

IMG_1600  _MG_1712

Any feedback would be appreciated.

Cheers

Charlotte

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4 thoughts on “Assignment C (DT): Rust, Old Walls & Texture

  1. Hey Charlotte! I think they’re looking great. I don’t see why the hinge wouldn’t count, but you’ll have to check in with David on that one. What you might want to try with your walls and textures is to go to them in the late afternoon, when the sunlight is coming on a strong side angle. This is called raking light or (extreme) side lighting, and makes textures much more obvious and three-dimensional.

    Here is a basic example of this technique described in studio lighting terms, but I think you’ll get the idea, the stronger an angle of the light, the more texture is apparent: http://www.school-of-digital-photography.com/2013/07/perfect-lighting-technique-for-photographing-texture-and-pattern.html

    😀 Steph

  2. Hi Charlotte.
    One thing I have noticed is that a lot of your photos are taken from head height and level with the subject or you are looking down onto the subject. Try experimenting with your angles and view the objects from different heights and positions and you may get some very interesting images.

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